Wellness in the time of COVID-19

BY LAURA WARD

Though you might feel somewhat powerless or limited in what you can do, there are ways you can offer support and take control of emotions. Below is a list of suggested activities that might help you during this difficult time (modified from handout created by Mount Holyoke University Counseling Service).  

? Seek support: Continue telehealth visits with your current mental health provider (The Governor of NY has announced that all co-pays for telehealth are being waived!), reach out by phone or FaceTime to friends or family members. You can also reach out to us at (607) 272-0212.

? Maintain a healthy routine: Stress can disrupt our daily routine, in turn causing more stress. It is important to maintain your regular schedule for sleep, eating, having fun, socializing (phone calls or FT), studying, and working etc. Creating a new routine will be necessary in the time of social distancing, but routines are helpful. If this is difficult to achieve by yourself, work with a friend – you can encourage each other in self-care. Click here for a list of some free sleep meditation apps https://positiveroutines.com/free-sleep-apps/ 

? Exercise: Physical activity can boost your immune system, help you feel good about yourself, increase your energy levels, alleviate stress, and help with sleep. With gyms closed, take a walk, run or hike outside. Try online workouts. There are lots of free workouts online. My favorite for free yoga workouts on YouTube is “Yoga with Adriene”. Utilize apps like “Map Your Run” to share your workouts with friends, set goals together, etc. Here is a list of some recommended work out and fitness apps https://www.self.com/story/best-new-workout-apps 

? Meditate: Find some time every day to do a bit of meditation. It helps you feel grounded and present. Try https://insighttimer.com/, the #1 free app for stress, anxiety and sleep.  

? Be informed: Uncertainty or misinformation can increase worry and cause panic. You can stay informed through official, fact-checked channels (e.g. World Health Organization website).  

? Pay attention to some positive news: Despite this difficult time, there is often some positive information in daily news. Decide whether the degree of your worry is consistent with reliable information (e.g.: incidence rate, death rate, current advancement of medicine etc.) I have been uplifted through reading stories about the way that people are helping each other during this crisis.  

? But limit the information: Sometimes, too much information leads to overload and more stress. So please try to limit your exposure (such as <1 hour/day), and make sure your information sources are reliable. Avoid reading information on the topic before going to bed – this can make it more difficult to fall asleep.  

? Think positively: Recall how you and your loved ones survived past hardships and crisis. Remind yourself that things are temporary and the current situation will pass. Please remember that no matter what happens in the future, you and your loved ones are striving to live day-by-day in the present. Change your perspective – consider the current time as an opportunity to show more care to yourself and your loved ones.  

? Share your thoughts/feelings with others (in moderation): Talking about your thoughts and feelings can help alleviate stress. Others might share similar feelings and help you feel less alone.

 ? Check in with your loved ones (in moderation): If you are worried about your loved ones, please reach out to them when you feel comfortable and lend a listening ear. Loved ones are often concerned about us and we may think they are trying to protect us by not being fully truthful; try not to jump to conclusions about their health and well-being, and please understand that we cannot always control others’ behaviors or change their beliefs. It can be helpful to have a few friends that you check in with regularly, even a simple “How are you doing today” text can help us all feel more connected. I enjoy using the free app Marco Polo to send videos back and forth to loved ones.  

? Learn to say “no”: Although sharing can be helpful, sometimes it is also important to say “no” when you are not comfortable with sharing or engaging in conversations on the topic. Just make sure you set your boundaries respectfully or leave conversations in an appropriate way.  

? Engage in conversations and activities unrelated to the outbreak and allow yourself to have some fun: There is still life outside of the current crisis. Reading news and engaging in activities unrelated to the current outbreak is okay – it doesn’t mean that you don’t care or aren’t concerned. Get a puzzle going, read a book out loud with family, break out the board games. Be creative, for example plan a FaceTime movie night with with your kids and their friends, all watching the same movie and eating popcorn at their respective houses.  

? Do some relaxation: Make sure to plan some relaxation or activities you enjoy into your daily schedule, such as deep breathing, spending time with friends (virtually), coloring, listening to music, taking a shower, taking a walk, etc.  

? Let it out: Sometimes expressing your emotions can be helpful – try journaling or keeping a voice diary, or let yourself be upset for a while. Here is a meditation for lovingly exploring your emotions. https://insighttimer.com/iamrachelricketts/guided-meditations/lovingly-exploring-our-emotions?utm_source=crm&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Black%20History%20Month%20-%20Week%203%20newsletter&utm_content=Variant%201&_branch_match_id=759402562456716377